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policemans whistle

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About policemans whistle

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  1. He said in one of his comments that he had a few ideas that he would like to put to the directors re the window. I wonder if he was considering a few swap deals. Say Murray and Gordon for Morrison of Falkirk.
  2. As Arbroath play in maroon do you think Stone thought he was passing it out to a Hearts player!
  3. Bobby put the drink down and go to bed
  4. I have heard that it is Brownlie who is out. They are saying out for four months. Rudden,Sena and Turner self isolating.
  5. I find it strange that managers pick players and then play them out of position. Mc Tominay to me is one of the best midfielders in Britain and in this moment of time even better than the much lauded Gilmour. But Clarke plays him as a defender, and if you go through most of the games he has played you will find, that he could have done better at some of the goals we have lost. Tierney's position is slightly different as he plays not the same but a similar role at Arsenal. Another point is that many of the goals scored in the Euro's start out wide with crosses into the box coming from the bye line and I think it would have been better if we had played a winger such as Forrest rather than another striker. But as we lost 5 goals at home then this team cannot continue and changes must be made but that is Mr Clarke's problem
  6. And what does that rhyme with?
  7. They had a place near the bottom of Sauchiehall street about opposite Lumleys and also one in Gordon Street. The Murray family are having a hard time of it at this moment but maybe later during the close season I will write chapter two.
  8. 'Jings, crivins, help ma boab ' Am I the auldest on here. My name is Stewart Murray and I now live in Falkirk. As a hobby I've written my first chapter of my life as a jags fan, and as I have said before, I started going to Firhill not long after Hitler was trying to bomb the chip shops in Knightswood. Thistle Forever My first Partick Thistle game The date was Saturday the 7th of September 1948 and I was sitting at the kitchen table eating my usual plate of porridge, when my Mother announced that instead of going shopping in Glasgow city centre, we were going to visit my brother Ian and his new wife Nan at their flat in Park Road. I was naturedly ly delighted at this news, as I was only eight years old at the time, and nothing was more boring than going shopping. My father had just died in January, and my mother found times very hard and a day out in Glasgow[ We lived in Priory Road, Knightswood] helped her in her grief. The only enjoyment I had, was we made time for afternoon tea at Craig's tearooms, where you selected from a three tier cake stand. Starting at the top, you had freshly made sandwiches, the middle tier was the scones and best of all on the bottom plate, was the delicious cream cakes. There was a slight drizzle in the air when we left on the 11A bus from Knightswood Cross and fifteen minutes later, we arrived at my brother Ian's flat at 19 Park road. Another surprise was awaiting for me that Saturday, when my brother announced he was taking me to Firhill for the Jags game against our rivals Clyde. My brother was not really a football fan, so I guess he used the game as an excuse for my mother to get to know his wife Nan a bit better, as he kept the wedding to himself. Nan came from Airdrie, and her nephew was Paul Jonquin, who played and captained Airdrie for many years. We arrived in plenty of time for the kick-off and I was sent down to near the front at the North end. Firhill was very different to what it is now. The ground was oval shaped and as it was used for Greyhound racing for a couple of nights a week, gantries with lights attached, were placed around the ground. The north end had an enclosure round it, with pie stalls and the greyhound tote offices on the back wall. A large totaliser board stood in the far left hand corner at the Glasgow end. It was not the first game I had been to, my brother in law, George Lockhart [ Married to my sister Jean] took me to see the League cup final between Falkirk and East Fife at Hampden Park. The crowd was not far off 58.000 and with being not able to see much, and no goals being scored, it was not the greatest game for my first match. Five minutes to kick-off at Firhill, I stood opened mouth, I had never been so excited in my life. The aroma coming from the pie stalls, the smell of the smoke coming from all the tenement chimney pots in Firhill road, fans arriving and shaking hands with their pals. You could see the excitement in their faces as they awaited the start of the game. Suddenly a roar went up, eight young boys ran out who looked not much older than myself. It was the ball boys. Then a explosion of noise heralded the Jags onto the park, followed by their opponents from the East side of the City, the mighty Clyde. Thistle went on to win the game 3 - 2 with goals from Walker, Wright and Brown. My favourite player that day was Tommy Wright, a fast raiding right-winger, who signed for Sunderland later on in the season. I went home a very happy boy that day, with the customary bag of chips after a game. The start of a wonderful relationship with a great Scottish football club
  9. There were many good performances on the park tonigh,t but to me one player stood out amongst them all was Stuart Bannigan. He was magnificent.
  10. Falkirk v Cove report. Falkirk raced through a very tired looking Cove defence to equalize.
  11. Hangers on. Hingers hanging on. One shilling to hang on to a rope in the doss house in the old days.
  12. Bobby all you need to do and this goes for others on this forum, is hand the computer, phone etc over to your nearest and dearest till at least 3 days after each game when we lose or draw. this can be returned to you along with the key to the padlocked fridge when we win. Take care son, once a Jag always a Jag.
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